Pentagon’s China Task Force has 4 Months to Submit Report on “Chinese Provocations”

Pentagon’s China Task Force has 4 Months to Submit Report on “Chinese Provocations”

Pentagon has assigned the China Task Force work to compile a report on China-related matters including “provocations.”

On Monday, Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III gave marching orders to the China Task Force led by Ely Ratner. He provided initial guidance to the unit, which draws participants from the office of the secretary of defense, the Joint Staff, the armed services, the combatant commands and the intelligence community.

“Today’s meeting is intended to formalize the mission, timing and outputs of the task force as they work towards a baseline assessment of departments, policies, programs and processes on China-related matters,” Pentagon Press Secretary John F. Kirby said.

The task force will finish in about four months. At the end, DOD officials want to provide Austin with specific and actionable recommendations and milestones to meet the “China challenge.”

Over the years, there have been many initiatives that addressed growing Chinese provocations in many areas. The secretary wants an assessment of the best ways to defend the international, rules-based order that has kept great power peace since the end of World War II, the Pentagon said in a statement.

The DOD effort is part of the government’s look at U.S.-China relations. The DOD China Task Force will specifically look at the DOD’s interaction with China, Kirby said. “What the secretary wants Mr. Ratner to do is to look at the pacing challenge that China poses to the department from our perspective, and what we need to do to make sure we’re ready to meet that challenge,” Kirby said.

The DOD effort is part of the government’s look at U.S.-China relations. The DOD China Task Force will specifically look at the DOD’s interaction with China, Kirby said. “What the secretary wants Mr. Ratner to do is to look at the pacing challenge that China poses to the department from our perspective, and what we need to do to make sure we’re ready to meet that challenge,” Kirby said.

China on the other hand accuses the U.S. of carrying out provocative activities. In the recent weeks, the latter has sent MQ-4C drones and other reconnaissance aircraft to the South China Sea (SCS). Even France sent an amphibious assault ship and a frigate in mid-February, and they are scheduled to transit the hotly disputed sea soon.

“The U.S. is attempting to contain China by rallying its Western allies to the South China Sea, which has more political rather than military significance. China is expected to continue facing pressure from the sea, as the U.S., its allies and India could keep stirring up troubles,” Chinese military experts were quoted as saying by the Global Times, owned by the government.

For this entire month, China will hold military exercises in the SCS near Leizhou Peninsula, close to where French warships are expected to pass by.

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